This is the interview with 'Amanda Fay', Game Designer of [Aveyond] & Owner of Amaranth Games.

Where to buy [Aveyond] : Click here.

Korean version of this Interview.

User image
 

1. Even if [Aveyond] got big hit in Indie Game scene, it's not well known in South Korea until now. Please introduce [Aveyond] & yourself.

Hi everyone! My name is Amanda Fitch, and one year ago, I released a game called Aveyond to gamers in the West. Aveyond is an anime-style role-playing game about a slave girl named Rhen, who learns that she has the power to become a great Sword Singer. Rhen leaves her life of slavery and learns the art of sword magic at a prestigious academy. While she is attending her studies, she learns that she is part of a prophecy, and must defeat a demon of great power to save her home. In the game, you can have up to eight people join your hero party, buy new outfits for Rhen, marry your characters, join guilds, collect pets, buy a mansion, and more.


2. At first, you sold [Aveyond] by yourself, and through portal Big Fish Games later. Could you please let us know, how different it is to sell by yourself & through big potal?

Selling games by yourself isn't hard, but it is difficult to spread the game when no one knows who you are. On my site, I have about 4,000 dedicated gamers, but big game portals can have millions of dedicated gamers. Attempting to get your game on a portal is a good idea as long as they don't take your rights away. You won't make as much money per game on a big portal, but the number of sales is very high. My advice is to sell both directly and through game portals if you decide to make a game.


3. At 2006, several not-very-casual games started selling through casual game portal sites, as [Aveyond] - [Kudos] - [Westward]. I think it's another big turn for Casual Game market, and also for Indie Game scenes. Please share your thoughts about that.

In my opinion, the industry has not correctly identified the tastes of the market they are targeting. I think we need more studies. I like games that require me to solve puzzles, have cheerful graphics, and don't require me to memorize twenty keys on my keyboard. I like games that test my ability to multi-task, match patterns, and that have lots of humor in them. I like games that are easy to learn, but hard to complete. Most of all, I like a good story.


4. We didn't expect such a great game from RPG maker, but it happened. Could you please let us know how you did such a great job?

I think that a good game has good gameplay and a good story. I spent lots of time working on a good story for Aveyond. I wanted players to love the story.

RPG Maker is a great tool, and the newest version, RPG Maker XP, is very flexible. Almost all core functionality provided by the engine is exposed through the RUBY scripting language. Most people don't know how powerful RPG Maker XP is. I hope that I can make more people aware of this great tool that can be used by non-programmers and advanced programmers to make games.


5. Your game is Japanese old school style RPG, but you are from USA. Even if there were some Indie RPGs in USA, they were basically Western (US) style. Please let me know how you became to make Japanese old school style RPG.

I love games from Asia. I think that games from the West are too serious and too dark. I made Aveyond because I could find nothing in the West that I wanted to play. My first RPGs were Final Fantasy and Zelda and they have always been my favorites. Games like that are not made over here, so I decided I had to try and make one.


6. As I know you are female, and it's not very common to see female game maker in Computer Game scene. Could you please share some idea about that, to make game as female?  

In the game industry, females are usually artists and writers, but not programmers. I hope that my story will help other females understand that they don't need to be programmers to make a game. Some programming is eventually needed, but tools like RPG Maker teach you how to program as you make your game. If you can do algebra, you can program a game. It's very easy!


7. [Aveyond] hit the market, and you might get several positive feedback from gamers. Please let us know some episodes about that.

A lot of parents write to me to tell me thank you. I've also had lots of people tell me that they liked the humor in Aveyond. Some of the feedback has come from children as young as 8 and from adults as old as 80!


8. Have you made another game, or do you have another upcoming project? If so, please let us know about that.

I have just finished my second game, Grimm's Hatchery. Grimm's Hatchery is a magical pet collection game. The goal is to collect lots of magical pets, raise them, and pick up eggs. To beat the game, you must sell your eggs and pets, earn gold coins, and eventually buy a kingdom.

I am currently working on Aveyond II: Ean's Quest, which is the sequel to Aveyond I: Rhen's Quest. The new game looks promising, and I predict that it will be the game that everyone remembers in the Aveyond series.


9. Have you played some Korean game, or experienced or even heard about Korean Gaming Scene & Market? If so, please share your opinion about that.

Yes! I love Korean online games. There are a couple of Korean games that have been translated into English, but many of the most beautiful ones are still not available for English speakers. Korea has the most talented artists that I've ever seen, and it shows in the games. I love games like KartRider, MapleStory, LaTale... there are so many of them!!!


10. Please pick 5 other games to recommend, and brief reason why. (5 Indie - 5 Major, if you can. If not, 5 Indie is still okay. More recommendations could be also okay.)

My favorite Indie games
---------------------
1. Everlong (Doug Carpenter-Freeware)
2. Cute Knight (Hanako Games-Shareware)
3. Kings Quest I & II Remake (AGD Interactive-Freeware)
4. Virtual Villagers (Last Day of Work-Shareware)
5. Bud Readhead (Space Ewe-Shareware)


My favorite Major games
---------------------
1. Final Fantasy series
2. Ragnarok
3. YS series
4. Kings Quest series
5. MapleStory


11. Please leave some message for Pig-Min interview readers.

Thank you for this great interview, Pig-Min! If any gamers want to make a game like Aveyond, please research game creation tools such as RPG Maker XP, Game Maker, and 3D Game Maker. I also wanted to let everyone know that I am going to work hard to make my future games available in Korean, Chinese, and Japanese. Happy gaming everyone, and if you have time, please visit the Aveyond community (www.amaranthia.com) over at Amaranth Games! Kind regards, Amanda. :)


Korean version of this Interview.
Related Articles



This is interview with Laurent Coulon, CEO of Liquid Dragon, which made [Word Krispies] & [The Odyssey: Winds of Athena].

Korean version of this Interview.


User image


1. How come to make 'Word Game', while there are tons of other genre in Casual / Indie Game scene? And what could be 'Best Fun' for 'Word Game' genre?

Our first game “The Odyssey: Winds of Athena” was a completely original game with a very unique design. It won several awards and got very good reviews in the press but did not sell well at all. Good reviews are good but we needed to generate money to keep going. So for our second game we decided to make a much more mass-market type of game. Word games are probably the most common kind of games on the market so we decided to tackle the genre to see if we could bring anything new to it.

It is not easy to make a Word game fun. Most people tend to view Word games as intellectual and not entertaining. We tried to fight this syndrome by having a lot of very unusual power-ups and by varying the pace of the game. The player spends 5 minutes taking his time making words and then is treated to a mini game where he has to react as fast as possible for 1 minute non-stop.


2. Did you choice some 'Target Player' for Word Games? If so, how did you choice them?

Most existing word games are aimed at people who are experts at all kind of word based activities, like Crosswords or Scrabble. One of the best sold game in the genre is Literati and it is clearly made for a public of word experts. We tried to make a word game that was more aimed at the general public. We wanted it to be challenging but also to be fun and appealing to anyone. That is why we went for a Cereal theme and used very bright and cheerful colors in the product.


3. I saw [Word Krispie] used 'Krispie' as important element. Is there some special reason to choose it, as focusing some 'Target Player'?

The whole concept of Cereal getting less crispy and sinking in a bowl of milk started as a joke while we were developing Winds of Athena. At first we were just joking about making a game in which you have to eat your soup. But as we were joking the idea took shape and we realized there was real gameplay potential in the idea.


4. [Bookworm Adventure], the mixture of 'Word Game' & 'RPG' released. What's your opinion about such fusion of 2 entirely different genre?

I haven’t played Bookworm Adventure yet so I’m afraid I cannot really comment on that. I do think overall combining long term gameplay elements (like long term resource building, or revealing a story progressively, or in this case building up RPG style stats) in any time trial game is a good idea. It makes the player want to keep playing after the time trial has expired because the player knows that he has already invested time in building something that will be lost otherwise. Otherwise even if your game is really fun people are likely to close it and forget about it once the time trial ends.


5. We could call it 'Word Game' as 'Another Method of Education' or 'Edu-tainment'. Did you expect something like that, when you make & release 'Word Game'? And there might be some 'positive feedback' about your works, as 'Word Game'. And you might feel very good about that. Could you please let us know some episodes about that briefly?

I try to put some sort of educational content in every product I design, even if it is very superficial. I believe that when people are entertained they tend to memorize things better than when trying to learn. I originally wanted to include some word definition based gameplay in Word Krispies so people could learn new words as they played. We didn’t end up going that way because of the amount of work that would have been necessary. We have been a bit surprised to see Word Krispies being popular in non English speaking countries. This did make me very satisfied. I am French and have lived in the U.S. for about 10 years. If this product can help other people perfect their English I feel more gratified than by thinking that I just made an entertaining game.


6. Player must make some words, with any alphabet tiles appeared. It seems to be done randomly, but there might be some algorithm, as I assume. Could you please let me know what kind of algorithm to make it happen?

I cannot give away some of the details. Like most games once you know how certain things work they become less fun. The letters are only partially random. They are a lot of rules under the surface to make sure that the player always has a balanced number of letters to make words with. Each letter has a probability of appearing based on its frequency in the language, and then there are a lot of other rules to avoid having too many identical letters or double letters that are too hard to use. For instance there is only one word in the English language with the letters ‘QUU’ used in sequence. The word is Squushy and it is not even present in most dictionaries.


7. You can't use all the words in the English culture, and you might have some basis to choice 'What words use & What words don't use'. Could you please let us know, how you decided (or choiced or made) 'Dictionary' of the game?

Actually I think Word Krispies has one of the most complete dictionaries of any other casual Word Game. We have over 350000 words in our dictionary. We had to write our own data format to compress this much data in the space of the game and to be able to search rapidly through it. Unlike most other games no words are censored out of the dictionary. If you want to spell swear words or obscene ones, the game will let you as long as they exist in the dictionary. We remove proper nouns and abbreviations like all Word Games do but otherwise anything goes. We also added a feature to let people add words to the dictionary if they happened to find a word the game did not recognize. We had a problem with the Broccoli Bob power up in the game. Since the power up picks one of the best word you can make with the letters in your bowl it could potentially pick an obscene word. If users want to type an obscene word while playing the game that’s their problem but we didn’t want the game telling you an obscenity. So we had to create a list of “bad” words that were banned from the power up. That list was quite hard to make. When you include slang there are so many words that someone somewhere will think is an insult that it was very hard to build a complete list.


8. Player must have basic knowledge of 'Word', if he plays 'Word Game'. If you'd make it for foreigners, who doesn't know 'Word' very well, what you would do to make it happen?

I think if we were trying to make a Word Game for non English speakers the design would have to be fundamentally different. The game should make you discover words so you could increase your vocabulary. In Word Krispies you don’t get to learn any new words you just use the ones you know and that’s good for practice but not for learning. To learn the game would have to help you discover new words and also provide a meaning for them.


9. Could you leave some advise something, if somebody wants to make 'Word Game' with non-English, as Korean or Japanese or Chinese?

I lived several years in China when I was a student and used to speak Chinese fairly well. Building a word game using Chinese characters is very challenging and the game would probably not be very fun. There are too many different characters and the combinations are too short to make it interesting. Japanese Kanji might be possible to combine to make words. With Chinese I would maybe try to provide players with keys or strokes that can be placed to create a desired character and then make a word with it. I don’t know enough about the Korean language to even begin thinking about the problem.


10. Please recommend us 5 other good games & reason why?

I’ve always liked games that make you think a lot and even more so if the game teaches you things from real life while you play.

From that point of view one of the most satisfying game I have ever played was Gabriel Knight 3: Sins of the Fathers. Puzzle games are also a favorite of mine, like lemmings. On the Indie side one of the most elegant puzzle game I have ever played is Aargon. I also remember playing a very simple little game a while back called Laser Tank that was quite interesting. And of course all the classic adventure games like Day of the Tentacle, or the whole Monkey Island series.


11. Have you played some Korean game, or experienced or even heard about Korean Gaming Scene & Market? If so, please share your opinion about that.

I do not believe I have ever played a Korean game. I know of several Korean MMORPGs but that is a genre I am not attracted by at all so I will probably never get to try one. I know MMORPGs are very popular in Korea, I also know Korea pioneered the whole Micro-Transaction business model. Beyond that I am not very familiar with the Korean market. We are too small of a company to think about international markets much. Maybe in a few years. :)
Related Articles



This is interview with Rob Adams, Producer of Gamescafe, which released [Word Web].

Korean vesrion of this Interview.

User image


1. How come to make 'Word Game', while there are tons of other genre in Casual / Indie Game scene? And what could be 'Best Fun' for 'Word Game' genre?  

WordWeb Deluxe was our second title for GamesCafe.com, and it was a company decision based off a group of game proposals that the development team has come up with at the time. There were other proposals which included different genres, but in the end we went with the strongest ideas. We tend to look towards innovation, when making our decisions on what projects are green lighted. That could be in the technology used to make the game or the game design itself.


2. Did you choice some 'Target Player' for Word Games? If so, how did you choice them?

First off we looked at all the top word games, then we set our sites on the biggest, then looked at who’s was playing this game and why. That’s how we formed a lot of our design choices about the game in the early prototype stages.


3. 'Spider' & 'Web' are important elements for [Word Web]. Is there some special reason to choose it?

The theme of the game was generated from the name of the game WordWeb. The Art Director took the name and ran with it, being aware that spiders are not the most loved creature he had to come out with a design that had mass-appeal and not too scary looking. We used 3D to create these spiders with personalities and we think it was pulled of quite well.


4. [Bookworm Adventure], the mixture of 'Word Game' & 'RPG' released. What's your opinion about such fusion of 2 entirely different genre?

Looking at what’s going on with the current generation casual games, I think we will see more of this marriage between genres. Some will be done well, and others will leave you scratching your head. Developers and publishers are always trying to reach a broader audience; it’s a gamble for the most part when making this type of game, so researching your audience is very important.


5. We could call it 'Word Game' as 'Another Method of Education' or 'Edu-tainment'. Did you expect something like that, when you make & release 'Word Game'?

With WordWeb there is an Edutainment element to it, and we new that when we introduced the mechanic of having the players spell a certain length of word to move on to other levels. By giving the player the ability to spell any word they want, (as long as it is in the game’s dictionary) we increased the difficulty by making the player spell longer words. We never penalized the player for spelling any word of any length they wanted, and over the course of the game we increased the length of the word required. We found during testing of this mechanic by the later levels the players had stopped spelling the short 3 to 5 letter words and were able to pick up larger patterns of letters. This was something most of the players never realized until we pointed it out to them, or when they went back and tried to play other word games, how limited they felt towards having to create shorter words.  

Once you play WordWeb Deluxe for over an hour you really see how your vocabulary can increase and challenges you to think more. We found that there is also a nitch market in the word genre where players who were word experts felt really rewarded with how the game progressed.


6. Player must make some words, with any alphabet tiles appeared. It seems to be done randomly, but there might be some algorithm, as I assume. Could you please let me know what kind of algorithm to make it happen?

The game board takes in to account, how many spaces there are, then we use a formula based on weighted characters to fill and replace spaces on the board. We also added other formulas in to the mix to determine how many bonus tiles can be placed, and when specials are generated. With the player being able to place down any character during play that they wanted, it was key for us to run a calculation for proximity on how many of one character can be in a certain area of the board.  


7. You can't use all the words in the English culture, and you might have some basis to choice 'What words use & What words don't use'. Could you please let us know, how you decided (or choiced or made) 'Dictionary' of the game?

The game has a dictionary of over 175,000 words, and it took quite some time to remove offensive words, and definitions, this was policed by ourselves, with thoughts of what our customers might find offensive. It’s a fine line with this kind of thing because no two people are a like, so it really came down to what our development team was comfortable with. Did we take out too much, or not enough the answer is “yes”.


8. Player must have basic knowledge of 'Word', if he plays 'Word Game'. If you'd make it for foreigners, who doesn't know 'Word' very well, what you would do to make it happen?

We only have the English version of this game available now, so a grasp of the English language, would allow you to enjoy the game a lot more. We have been in talks about opening the game up to other languages, but as of right now nothing are in the works.  This game could really be used for a learning tool for people who want to learn the English language because once you know a few words in the English language you can play the game and learn their definitions and context as well.


9. Could you leave some advise something, if somebody wants to make 'Word Game' with non-English, as Korean or Japanese or Chinese?

The best advice is to make sure you have people who have a good understanding of Korean, Japanese, or Chinese working on the dictionary. Because cultures are so different across the board, a pedestrian knowledge of the language and culture could get you in to trouble.


10. Please recommend us other good games & meaning why?

I am going to plug Mah-Jomino Deluxe here because of what we did to show some innovation in a Mahjong game. Changing the Mahjong tiles into 2 sided pieces, it’s a mechanic that is starting to show up in other casual games; plus its production values.

There is a lot of good games out there right now with great production values, for the consumers of casual games its like walking into a candy store and everything is free, its hard to know where to start. I still think some of the early tiles are the best like BookWorm, Jewel Quest, even Snood.


11. Have you played some Korean game, or experienced or even heard about Korean Gaming Scene & Market? If so, please share your opinion about that.

I have been following what has been going on in Korea with Nexon, we been playing one of their games Maple Story.

Korea is a different market than North America; PC MMO games are the biggest movers in Korea while in North America, consoles reigns supreme, with the exception of WoW of course J. With new generation consoles and the increased broadband penetration in North America there is much we can learn from Korea.


12. Please leave some message for Pig-MIn Interview Readers, especially for whom are interested in 'Word Games'.

Give Word Web Deluxe a try, it’s worth it, it will challenge you and provide an interesting spin on the words games.

Thank you for your time.


Korean vesrion of this Interview.
Related Articles



Interview : JTR, maker of [Death Worm]

This is e-mail interview with JTR, who made [Death Worm].

Korean version of this Interview.

User image


1. Many people in Korea played [Death Worm], but don't know who made it, because [Death Worm] has only 1 official thread & don't have any homepage. Could you please introduce yourself & how to make this game?

I'm a 20 years old (born 1986) guy from Finland, and I've been working with this "Game Maker" program for about a year. The "Game Maker" program was made by Mark Overmars.


2. [Death Worm] is one of the best freeware game ever I experienced.  Simple but unique play style, good escalation. Could you please let me know how come to make this game?

I'm glad you like it. I was inspired to make this game partly by a TV-series called "Tremors," but mostly by a rumored real life killer-worm called the "Mongolian Death Worm."


3. [Death Worm] might get several feedbacks from players, as I assume. Could you please share some episodes about that?

Ok. Here's a few:

-"Wow this is simply amazing, i really love this game. ether you can 'storm the front' or sneak up as an Predator. This is really good. ideas like this is just what GM is for" - loffe

-"Awesome game! Very old-school. Reminds me of Dune..." - web1992

-"Registerd at the forum just to say what an awesome game this is. Maybe it is becuase I am hardcore 'Tremors' fan, but I really enjoyed playing this." - GetAGrip

-"this games great, and realy fun, theres nothing better than being a giant worm and eating everything,love it, couldent stop playing, graphics and sounds are all good,great game JTR." - twaggy

-"one of the funniest GM made game ever i played... good job!! 9/10" - cougar_zero


4. Have you made another game, or do you have another upcoming
project? If so, please let us know about that.

I've made some small minigames.

http://host-a.net/JTR/Gunslinger.exe
http://host-a.net/JTR/Rat%20Trap.exe
(F1 is used for ingame help.)

I'll let you know when I finish a new game.


5. What do you think about Freeware Indie Game scene? Please share your thoughts.

It's a great thing, of course. Very interesting to see what kind of games people make. Freeware Indie games are very popular in Finland, too.


6. Have you played some Korean game, or experienced or even heard about Korean Gaming Scene & Market? If so, please share your opinion about that.

I probably have, since I play games alot. Arcade games, too. But I rarely pay attention to what country a game was made in, so I can't remember any.


7. Please pick other 5 Indie & 5 Major games to recommend, and brief reason why.

Ok. I can recommed these games:

INDIE GAMES----------------------------------------
"Cortex Command."
Shooting game for 1-4 players. It's still in development, (a single player campaign is coming) but it's already perfectly playable. I like it because it's kind of like the "Worms"-games, but this is in realtime. (No turns.)
http://datarealms.com/

"Lost Labyrinth."
"Roguelike" game about exploring a dungeon, with Zelda-like graphics. I like this because the interface is very easy to use, and the dungeon is very different everytime.
http://laby.toybox.de/index.php?sprache=1

"Atomic Butcher."
I like this because of the theme. You play as a mutant that's sent out of a nuclear-shelter to collect meat.
http://www.dashumankapital.net/index.php

"Weird Worlds : Return to Infinite Space."
Shareware game about exploring space. This was mean't to be replayed many times. It's short and sweet, and different every time.
http://www.shrapnelgames.com/digital_eel/Weird_worlds/1.htm

"Emerald Miner."
I like this because of the nostalgic retro-style graphics and sounds.
http://www.the-underdogs.info/game.php?id=4270

MAJOR GAMES----------------------------------------
"Morrowind. (Game of the Year-edition)"
I like these kinds of freeform RPG's. I play it on Xbox.

"Fallout 2"
Another freeform RPG with a post-nuclear theme.

"Silent Hill 1-3"
Great horror games.

"Red Dead Revolver."
the Best Wild West game on the consoles, in my opinion.

Can't think of a fifth major game, but "Donald in Maui Mallard" (on the Sega Genesis/Megadrive) is one of my favourite games of all times.
------------------------------------------------


8. Please leave some message for Pig-Min interview readers.

My message to the readers: Thanks everybody for checking this interview and good luck in your games! -JTR


Korean version of this Interview.
Related Articles



This is Interview with Dan Ferguson, who is Founder of Blackdot & Director of Game Development of [Chicktionary] & many other games.

Korean version of this interview
.

User image


1. How come to make 'Word Game', while there are tons of other genre in Casual / Indie Game scene? And what could be 'Best Fun' for 'Word Game' genre?

The market is flooded with traditional match three, connect four casual puzzle games and shooters. Chicktionary was built to fill a segment that seemed to be overlooked. We have a staff of 6 writers who create crossword and trivia content games for us. We launch over a dozen content game shows a day to users who subscribe to our www.boxerjam.com site. When we realized that not many people were creating downloadable or online word games, we decided to start producing a series of games for that audience.


2. Did you choice some 'Target Player' for Word Games? If so, how did you choice them?

We run the game web sites, www.kewlbox.com and www.boxerjam.com and both of them have a huge female audience. Most of our female visitors enjoy playing word games or games that you need to use your brain. Women tend to play games that are more cerebral. Chicktionary was built for an audience that wanted something fun, but challenging to their intellect.


3. [Chicktionary] chose 'Chicken' as basic element. Do you have some special reason to use it?

We wanted to make a word game that didn’t take itself too seriously. We wanted something fun, cute, silly and appealing to a wide audience. We didn’t want to do anything that was too obvious, like a game in a library. My business partner, Mike Bielinski and I started working on the initial game design by drawing out concepts on a marker board. We thought it would be funny if there was a line of chickens that laid eggs with letters on them. As players type out the letters, the chickens would squeeze out an egg and make a funny sound. This was a lot of fun. Then we realized that players may need to remove a letter by hitting their backspace key. When we started shooting the eggs back into the chickens, we started laughing! When we saw beta testers laughing as well, we knew we had made the right decision.

Chicktionary is based on an game we originally created named Fowl Words. We thought it was particularly clever, by playing on the word FOWL and FOUL. Foul in English means naughty or bad, so we thought it was a bit risqu? by calling our game FOWL WORDS. At first glance, people might think the game was naughty. But when they see the chickens, they would realize that the game is a play on words. It was a big hit. When publishers started to pick it up, they didn’t have as much of a sense of humor. They requested that the games name be changed. So we spent some time reworking the game and came up with CHICKTIONARY. One of the first companies that wanted the game was Merriam Webster, a producer and publisher of dictionaries. They appreciated the twist.


4. [Bookworm Adventures], the mixture of 'Word Game' & 'RPG' released. What's your opinion about such fusion of 2 entirely different genre?

It is exciting. Several years ago, word games were thought of as boring. The idea of games “mash-ups”, the combining of several different genres into one unique experience, is giving games a fresh new life. We all grew up with crosswords or word search games. That seems so tame and boring now. By taking simple word play concepts we are building several new games that are mash-ups of technologies and game play that were impossible several years ago. The potential is as limitless as a developers imagination.

We are making word games that are integrated into online mapping technologies as well as sports and MMOG games. We just created a bowling game with some word gameplay that is really fun and unique. We will be launching it in a few weeks. We also just released a game for Microsoft MSN Games that includes a word game tied to their new Live Search technologies. You can see that game here - http://zone.msn.com/en/flexicon/default.htm

Whoever said word games were boring is obviously disconnected to what is happening out in the world.


5. We could call it 'Word Game' as 'Another Method of Education' or 'Edu-tainment'. Did you expect something like that, when you make & release 'Word Game'? And there might be some 'positive feedback' about your works, as 'Word Game'. And you might feel very good about that. Could you please let us know some episodes about that briefly?

That is very interesting. We have been building games for a long time. When we started to get emails and letters from teachers and doctors about how they are using the games, we were really surprised. We have received emails from several doctors who use the games to test their patients. A brain surgeon wrote to us and said he uses the games during therapy, after they have had brain surgery.

We have a lot of schools who use Chicktionary in their learning computer labs. We’ve sold multi-user licenses to public and private school systems who are now integrating the games into their curriculum. This is especially exciting because we often get letters from teachers who write about how their students love the games. Chicktionary gives teachers a tool to use that makes learning fun. Because the games have a scoreboard system, teachers tell us that the students often try to beat each others scores. We also have parents who write to us about some of our word and math games. People are using the games to spend time with their children, help them learn about spelling and word play. We have also created some math games that have proven to be just as successful.


6. Player must make some words, with any alphabet tiles appeared. It seems to be done randomly, but there might be some algorithm, as I assume. Could you please let me know what kind of algorithm to make it happen?

The way this game works is taking a word that has 7 letters, scrambling those letters up and creating a list of 30-40 other words out of the original 7 letters. The challenge is finding all of the words. The game has a dictionary library built into it. As you spell, it is constantly crosschecking against that library. So it knows if the word you are spelling is correct or not. There are also algorithms built into it to male more common words load first. So as you are typing a word, it helps you along.


7. You can't use all the words in the English culture, and you might have some basis to choice 'What words use & What words don't use'. Could you please let us know, how you decided (or choiced or made) 'Dictionary' of the game?

We reviewed every word in the library and rated common words as well as flagged every potential slang or dirty word. The game picks the most common words and requires the player to find them to advance to the next level. If a player decides to place a more obscure word or a dirty word in place of a common word, they can. However, some of our more conservative clients or publishers have asked us to remove any dirty words. Which we have done. However the game will never use a dirty word as a required word to finish the puzzle.


8. Player must have basic knowledge of 'Word', if he plays 'Word Game'. If you'd make it for foreigners, who doesn't know 'Word' very well, what you would do to make it happen?

The game is currently available for the English market. The library of words in the game are built that way. If we were to do a different language, we would release the game with a different language library built into it. We have been approached by several companies outside of the United States to do just that.


9. Could you leave some advise something, if somebody wants to make 'Word Game' with non-English, as Korean or Japanese or Chinese?

Creating a game using character word languages may be difficult. We have discussed it internally and we may have found some interesting alternatives. It would probably be a different game altogether. We thought a game based on phonetics would be fun.


10. Please introduce other good Word Games from your site.

We have created several other word games.  We actually have a section on our www.kewlbox.com website dedicated to word games. But these are my favorite.

  1. Wordo ?
    1. I love this game. Players attempt to spell words within a wall of stacked tiles. As time ticks on, more tiles are added form the top. As the player spells out words, the tiles used are removed, helping keep the tiles form stacking up. Remove enough and you end up unlocking a casual, non-word style game. The game has special trix to help you out.
    2. http://www.kewlbox.com/games/gameDetail.aspx?GameID=109
  2. Letter Rip ?
    1. A word search game were users must find words on a game board using tiles. As a tile is used, that letter is replaced with a new letter and the point value of the tile is increased. The game board changes per round, much like a Mahjong game, so the game play is unique and different every time.
    2. http://www.kewlbox.com/games/gameDetail.aspx?GameID=83
  3. Writer’s Block ?
    1. Think of a Rubik’s Cube with letters on it. This game challenges users to find as many words and they can using letters on a particular side of a cube. Players can rotate sections of the main cube to get new letters. Very fun and very addictive.
    2. http://www.kewlbox.com/games/GameDetail.aspx?GameId=137
  4. Flexicon ?
    1. The goal in Flexicon is to complete the entire puzzle. It plays like a normal crossword puzzle, except that the four answer grids are overlapping and only one is played at a time. One long answer stretches across the entire puzzle. The overlapping grids give you many ways to attack the long answer.
    2. http://www.boxerjam.com/puzzles/puzzlemod.php?puzzle=zfl
  5. Clink ?
    1. The goal in Clink is to fill in all of the shaded blanks that form the answers to the clues on the right. Each of the answers shares a word (or part of a word) with the answer above and below it. The top and bottom answers are also (c)linked.
    2. http://www.boxerjam.com/puzzles/puzzlemod.php?puzzle=zfl
  6. Dingbats! ?
    1. In Dingbats! you try to guess the three answers before time runs out. The answers can be words or phrases. The three answers are related in some way, and their clues and the title give you a hint about the answers and the relationship between them. The vowels in the answers are represented by "Dingbats." Each Dingbat symbol represents one vowel... the same vowel in all three answers. So if you know a certain Dingbat is an E in one answer, then you know it is an E in each of that day's three answers.
    2. http://www.boxerjam.com/puzzles/puzzlemod.php?puzzle=zdb
  7. Magnet-O ?
    1. Magnet-O is a word phrase game in which you link "word magnets" together into phrases, and then link those phrases together into one long chain. Your goal is to piece together the entire chain. The "word phrases" can be common phrases or expressions (like "Dog Days Of Summer"), well-known names, song, movie, or book titles, or names of places.
    2. http://www.boxerjam.com/puzzles/puzzlemod.php?puzzle=zmg

Several of the Boxerjam games allow users to compete against others in tournaments.


11. Have you played some Korean game, or experienced or even heard about Korean Gaming Scene & Market? If so, please share your opinion about that.

I lived in Seoul as a child, so Korea has always been of interest of mine. I am particularly interested in the way the game industry, especially the mobile space, evolves in popularity from one genre to another. One game will come out that is radically different and set the tone for most of the development for that year. The Korean game space may be primarily focused on hardcore gaming. But we do see a lot of interest in online games. Several of our games end up on Korean web sites. Even though our games are made here in Dallas, Texas, we try to make them as universal as possible. Many of our games have very little English in them so a user does not need to read any rules to become a champion at playing them.


12. Please leave some message for Pig-MIn Interview Readers, especially for whom are interested in 'Word G'.

We hope that your readers enjoy the games we produced. Please visit www.kewlbox.com or www.boxerjam.com for some fun free games.


Korean version of this interview.

Related Articles



« Previous : 1 : ... 2 : 3 : 4 : 5 : 6 : 7 : 8 : Next »

Notices

Archives

Categories

All (269)
Notice (26)
Indie Game (137)
Not-Indie Game (35)
Indie Music (16)
Column (14)
Interview (40)

Calendar

«   2020/04   »
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
      1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30    

Site Stats

Total hits:
3986769
Today:
10
Yesterday:
9